3 Page Dissertation Premise

Due 9/15  8 p.m EST

(3 pages: 1 page Premise, 1 page cover, 1 page references)

Be on time, Original work!

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The Assignment: Dissertation Premise, first draft

(3 pages: 1 page Premise, 1 page cover, 1 page references)

· With consideration to the Instructor and peer feedback you have received, and following the guidance found in the Dissertation Premise Guide, develop a first draft of your Premise.

Completing the Premise The Dissertation Premise consists of four parts: title, problem statement, approach for the study, and references. An annotated outline is included in this guide and should be used to create your premise document. You will also find a sample premise herein to serve as a model for your work, and a preformatted template is available on the Writing Center’s Doctoral Capstone Form and Style website. Your primary goal for the premise is to narrow your dissertation topic such that you have provided a general sense of the direction of your research by identifying an initial problem to study. At this point, you do not need to know everything about the research project, especially the details of your methodology.

Agriculture Short Answer

Part 1: List, in bullet point fashion, your top 5 Take-Aways (knowledge that you gained) from this chapter. See the assignment instructions for examples of appropriate Take-Aways.

Part 2: Reflective notes are a “metacognitive” strategy; that is, they help you “think about your thinking.” Metacognition is the mark of a mature learner and helps you remember what you read or watch. Reflection means thinking about what’s important and why, how points connect, what surprises you and why, and what questions you still have.

Below, provide complete and critical thoughts for each of the four questions about Chapter 1.

1. What seemed really important in this chapter and why did it seem important?

ANSWER

2. What did you read that reminded you of something you knew before, or connected up with something else you are learning, and why?

ANSWER

3. What surprised you in this chapter? Why was this surprising for you?

ANSWER

4. What questions do you still have after reading this chapter?

(ALL learners (that’s YOU) MUST include at least 1 question)

ANSWER

FYI

Part 1.develop a list of 5 ‘take-aways’ (as directed in the provided answer document) after reading Chapter 1 in Agriculture and Food Controversies.

Things to know about ‘take-away’ statements:

• ‘Take-Away’s’ are substantial statements that identify important and factual information about Chapter 1.

• Statements should represent information that students find interesting or important in Chapter 1 and does not need to be verbatim (exactly as stated) from the book but can be a summary statement that reflects information. Think college-level thoughts

EXAMPLES:

Example of a poor statement: People cannot eat Dent Corn

Why it is poor – not substantial and definitely not college-level thinking.

Example of an appropriate statement: Dent corn earned its name because of the ‘dent’ at the top of each kernel and cannot be eaten in its raw form by people because the outer layer of the kernel is too thick for the human digestive system.

Why it is appropriate – brings up a couple of points and the statement itself reflects more substantial college-level structure and thinking.

Remember: think completely and critically

ANT 234 Family, Kin & Groups Week 1 Quiz (All Correct)

ANT 234 Family, Kin & Groups Week 1 Quiz

All correct

 

 

 

Question 1. 1. To understand the practice of virginity testing in Turkey, one must first understand: (Points : 1)

how Turkish villagers understand the reproductive process.

the role of in-laws in the family structure.

the history of the Ottoman Empire.

the role of women in the Turkish family.

 

 

Question 2. 2. According to the anthropologist Paco Underhill, what factor most influences U.S. shoppers’ positive or negative experiences? (Points : 1)

The products available in the store

The spatial organization of a store

Their perceived waiting times in the store.

The prices of items in the store.

 

 

Question 3. 3. What makes cultural anthropology different from other forms of social science research? (Points : 1)

The use of surveys

The use of fieldwork and participant observation

A focus on qualitative research

The use of opinion polls

 

 

Question 4. 4. Why do human rights activists usually reject moral and cultural relativism? (Points : 1)

They have little interest in other societies and cultures.

Their main focus is on international law.

Relativism assumes that there is a universally accepted value system.

Relativism requires observers to accept all values and practices.

 

 

Question 5. 5. Nancy Scheper-Hughes argues that anthropologists must: (Points : 1)

strive to be as objective as possible.

be critically grounded, morally engaged, and politically committed.

not delve into local politics while engaging in research.

try to maintain the idea of moral relativism.

 

 

Question 6. 6. The relativistic fallacy is the notion that: (Points : 1)

certain cultural values are morally superior to others.

the values of more traditional cultures are more humane than the values of industrial societies.

one cannot make moral or ethical judgments about the beliefs or practices found in other cultures.

it is impossible to not think your own values are better than other values.

 

 

Question 7. 7. What does it mean to view culture as a form of text? (Points : 1)

This is a way to learn the underlying facts about foreign practices.

This is a way of understanding the symbols associated with cultural practices and performances.

This is a way of reducing the study of other cultures to books and articles.

This is a way of avoiding the relativistic fallacy.

 

 

Question 8. 8. According to Clifford Geertz, people impose meaning on their actions and experiences because: (Points : 1)

without these, all actions and experiences would appear to be pointless and emotional.

our brains compel us to do so.

otherwise, they would be unsure of how to act.

without such meanings outsiders would be unable to understand these experiences.

 

 

Question 9. 9. People differ in how they view the world because: (Points : 1)

they live in different geographical locations.

religions have different views of the world.

cultures and hence cultural norms differ.

of biological differences.

 

 

Question 10. 10. By examining the “Happy Meal” advertised by one fast-food chain, anthropologists can, among other things: (Points : 1)

draw broad conclusions about American tastes in food.

deduce how much our consumption patterns create waste and environmental damage.

provide insights into industrial and agricultural history and gender roles.

none of these

 

 

 

Question 11. 11. The chairs in a classroom are: (Points : 1)

a traditional feature of higher education.

an example of technology in the classroom.

designed to place students in a specific posture.

provided for student safety and comfort.

 

 

Question 12. 12. What can we learn from the anthropologist Richard Scaglion’s failed attempt to explain Newton’s law of gravity to his Abelam friends in Papua New Guinea? (Points : 1)

In trying to explain the concept, we need a textbook.

His audience had no science background and hence could not understand the concept.

We might not actually understand much of what we take as scientific fact in our society.

Newton’s law did not apply in this context.

 

 

Question 13. 13. Cannibalism is a practice historically found only in non-European societies. (Points : 1)

True

False

 

 

Question 14. 14. The common life events that all people experience differ mainly in the: (Points : 1)

languages used to explain these events.

meanings people give to these events.

geographical locations in which these events occur.

ways certain families explain and experience these events.

 

 

Question 15. 15. Sati is the practice of a widow burning herself on her husband’s funeral pyre in India. (Points : 1)

True

False

 

 

Question 16. 16. A warrior in Papua New Guinea who has a nose ornament can readily understand piercing-for-beauty in the Western world. (Points : 1)

True

False

 

 

Question 17. 17. Human attitudes toward death are generally similar. (Points : 1)

True

False

 

 

Question 18. 18. To assert that a man from a different society dressed in ceremonial attire looks odd demonstrates the ethnocentric fallacy. (Points : 1)

True

False

 

 

Question 19. 19. A relativist position assumes that a specific belief or behavior can best be understood: (Points : 1)

in relation to other cultures with similar beliefs and behaviors.

by finding a similar belief or behavior in your own culture.

by dissecting and analyzing its structure and meaning.

in relation to the cultural systems of meaning in which it is embedded.

 

 

Question 20. 20. In reading American football as a cultural text, it seems that Americans feel about football the same way they feel about: (Points : 1)

the workplace.

war.

marriage.

death.

 

 

 

Epidemiology: (PUBH – 6035 – 2) Module 4 Quiz

Question 1 

  1. A study that compares the prevalence of high blood      pressure among current Massachusetts Turnpike toll booth collectors with      the current prevalence of high blood pressure of current Turnpike office      workers. What type of study is this?

 

a.

Case report

 

b.

Case series

 

c.

Cohort study

 

d.

Cross-sectional study

1.7 points

Question 2 

  1. A strength of BOTH cross-sectional and an ecological      studies is:

 

a.

good for early stage of knowledge

 

b.

good for individual- level effects

 

c.

temporal sequence is   maintained

 

d.

exposure and effect occur in the   same person

1.7 points

Question 3 

  1. The Health Professionals Cohort Study began in 2005 in      order to evaluate a series of hypotheses about men’s health relating      nutritional factors to the incidence of serious illnesses such as cancer,      heart disease, and other vascular diseases. Every two years, members of      the study will receive surveys with questions about diseases and      health-related topics like smoking, physical activity, and medications      taken. The surveys that ask detailed dietary information will be      administered in four-year intervals. What kind of cohort study is      this?

 

a.

Retrospective

 

b.

Prospective

 

c.

Ambidirectional

1.6 points

Question 4 

  1. An analysis that includes all subjects who were      randomized to the treatment and comparison groups, regardless of whether      they received or completed their assigned study protocol.

 

a.

Run-in period

 

b.

Efficacy Analysis

 

c.

Comparability

 

d.

Intent-to-treat analysis

1.7 points

Question 5 

  1. What is the primary objective of any case-control or      cohort study?

 

a.

A well-designed experimental   study.

 

b.

Accurate randomization of the   intervention.

 

c.

Adjustment for the time sequence   of events.

 

d.

A valid result.

1.7 points

Question 6 

  1. Which study design is most appropriate to study      multiple outcomes from a single exposure?

 

a.

Cross-sectional

 

b.

Cohort

 

c.

Case-control

 

d.

Ecological

1.7 points

Question 7 

  1. A case-control study is most efficient design for      studying the health effects of rare exposures.

True

False

1.6 points

Question 8 

  1. The ecological fallacy states that associations seen on      the group level will not necessarily be present on the individual level.

True

False

1.6 points

Question 9 

  1. A major advantage of a randomized clinical trial is      that it rules out self-selection of patients to the different treatment      groups.

True

False

1.6 points

Question 10 

  1. An experimental study was conducted among adults with      Type 2 diabetes in order to determine if a new medication was more      effective in reducing blood glucose levels than the currently used      medication. What type of experimental study is this?

 

a.

Individual preventive

 

b.

Individual therapeutic

 

c.

Community preventive

 

d.

Community therapeutic

1.7 points

Question 11 

  1. Which of the following techniques used in experimental      studies can be directly applied in cohort studies (choose all that apply)?

 

a.

Randomization

 

b.

Placebos

 

c.

Blinding

 

d.

Run-in period

1.7 points

Question 12 

  1. A study was done to determine whether the amount of      money spent on soft drinks was related to mortality from diabetes. The      investigators collected data on per capita (average per person) soft drink      consumption in ten US states and examined its relationship to mortality      rates from diabetes in those ten states. In order to calculate per capita      sales they gathered annual data on soft drink sales from commerce records      and then divided these figures by the state’s population from the most      recent census. The mortality data were gathered from the vital records      department in each state. What type of study is this?

 

a.

Ecological Study

 

b.

Case-control study

 

c.

Cross-sectional study

 

d.

Cohort study

1.7 points

Question 13 

  1. What sources can be used to identify controls for a      case-control study?

 

a.

General population

 

b.

Hospital/clinic patients

 

c.

Friends and relatives

 

d.

All of the above

1.7 points

Question 14 

  1. When is it desirable to use a case-control study      (choose all that apply)?

 

a.

When the disease is rare

 

b.

When little is known about the   disease

 

c.

When the disease has a short   latent period

1.7 points

Question 15 

  1. What is the purpose of the control group in a      case-control study?

 

a.

To provide information on the   disease distribution in the population that gave rise to the cases

 

b.

To provide information on the   exposure distribution in the population that gave rise to the cases