Process of Developing New Software Paper

Process of Developing New Software Paper
This week we discuss the overall process of developing new software.  Please also note the differences between software development and methods.
In software engineering, a software development process is a process of dividing software development work into distinct phases to improve a design, product management, and project management. It is also known as a software development life cycle. The methodology may include the pre-definition of specific deliverables and artifacts that are created and completed by a project team to develop or maintain an application. Most modern development processes can be vaguely described as agile. Other methodologies include a waterfall, prototyping, iterative and incremental development, spiral development, rapid application development, and extreme programming. Some people consider a life-cycle “model” a more general term for a category of methodologies and a software development “process” a more specific term to refer to a specific process chosen by a specific organization. Process of Developing New Software Paper.
For example, there are many specific software development processes that fit the spiral life-cycle model. The field is often considered a subset of the systems development life cycle. Software Development Process The process of software development services goes through a series of stages in a stepwise fashion that almost every developing company follows.

ORDER A PLAGIARISM-FREE PAPER NOW

Known as the ‘software development life cycle,’ these six steps include planning, analysis, design, development & implementation, testing & deployment, and maintenance.

  1. 1. Planning: Without the perfect plan, calculating the strengths and weaknesses of the project, development of software is meaningless. Planning kicks off a project flawlessly and affects its progress positively.
  2. 2. Analysis: This step is about analyzing the performance of the software at various stages and making notes on additional requirements. The analysis is very important to proceed further to the next step.
  3. 3. Design: Once the analysis is complete, the step of designing takes over, which is basically building the architecture of the project. This step helps remove possible flaws by setting a standard and attempting to stick to it.
  4. 4. Development & Implementation: The actual task of developing the software starts here with data recording going on in the background. Once the software is developed, the stage of implementation comes in where the product goes through a pilot study to see if it’s functioning properly.
  5. 5. Testing: The testing stage assesses the software for errors and documents bugs if there are any.
  6. 6. Maintenance: Once the software passes through all the stages without any issues, it is to undergo a maintenance process wherein it will be maintained and upgraded from time to time to adapt to changes. Almost every software development company follows all the six steps.

Dealing with changing requirements customers change their minds. The competitive landscape shifts. A new and better technology goes live. There are tons of reasons why you need flexibility in your requirements, instead of trudging forward with a plan that could lead to budget waste and obsolete technology at launch. Customer input happens throughout the development process. Gains customer and stakeholder feedback on features sooner rather than later. Improves scope control because stakeholders can add new requirements, shift priorities, or rethink requirements on a feature or architectural level.
Gives project teams the room to take risks and innovate based on customer feedback without sacrificing too much time or budget because agile teams can pivot on requirements as needed. Product backlog sets development priorities. Process of Developing New Software Paper.  Managing or grooming the product backlog can be an art unto itself. In some organizations, the scrum master manages the backlog. Other organizations might choose to have product managers or cross-functional team leaders involved in managing it. Either way, it’s a far more open affair because everyone from the whole team to stakeholders to customers might have input into the backlog’s priorities.
Daily meetings promote communications Holding daily meetings, or stand-ups, are another tool for managing changing requirements. These meetings take place at the same time each day and give team members a chance to talk about the tasks they’ve completed and any obstacles standing in their way. A properly managed daily meeting lets developers, team leads and stakeholders (if invited) to share information. Some of that information could be issues and feedback about product requirements that might arise during the implementation process. The impact of changing requirements on the project schedule can be discussed immediately and open for input by management and team members. Task boards make developer tasks and details visibleProduct requirements documents are too often read once and left in an email inbox for the duration of the project. Agile development uses the concept of a task board to divide up tasks into multiple columns and make them visible 24/7. These boards parcel out projects into the following stages: To doIn progress, testingDoneTasks boards help manage changing requirements because of the visibility they offer, which include: Project requirement status is visible to every team member.
Dependencies of project requirements impacted by changing requirements are clear.S hows threaded comments about the changing requirements before and during sprints from the developer and other team members. User stories and sprints orchestrate change. A product owner creates a story. Developers can build a new application feature based on the story. During or after the sprint where that feature is built, a salesperson delivers feedback from a customer that shows the feature is missing a critical functionality. Process of Developing New Software Paper.
The product owner can create a new story to build out the feature with the missing functionality during the next sprint. Managing change is part of project work changing requirements will always dog development teams. The agile development gives project teams the platform, culture, and tools to manage changing requirements effectively so they can deliver products and services that meet or exceed their customers’ expectations. This is a big part of business success! Use of rapid prototyping is the best option if possible. So this will help customers feel sure of their requirements and minimize changes. To minimize the effort of regression testing later first prepare for risk analysis of changes. If possible then new requirements should move to the next Phase of the application. Stick to original requirements in the current Phase. Spend adequate time to think of probable changes in the initial stages of the project. Make sure that the code is well documented and commented as well. For developers, this helps to make the code changes easily.
Prepare for requirements traceability matrix that would help to trace what all test case needs to update if the specific requirement is changed. Creating automated testing in such a way that if changes in requirement then expected effort is minimum to deal with new changes. The generic level test plan should be prepared & more flexible test case should be designed (it is not simple to design flexible test cases). Minimize detailed test cases writing, you can go with high-level test cases if the requirement changes continuously. Understand risk involved in ad-hoc testing let’s focus less on comprehensive test plans and test cases. Automation test scripts should be created more flexible & adaptive in nature. First, concentrate on automation testing piece that probably remains unchanged after a change in requirements. Make sure that management and client understand the cost, schedules & impact of changes in requirement and they are acceptable with the changes. If the same issue still exists then figure out why these requirements are not aligned with realism. You have to refactor the software development process followed in your organization.

ORDER A PLAGIARISM-FREE PAPER NOW

So follow Agile Development process might be the GOOD option to go with because it allows you change in requirements in late in Software Development process as well, it is intended for that. Also, the end user or customer involvement is on all stages, so the customer is aware of what is implementing & if they want to changes in requirement or add new requirement then it can be easily accommodated.

According to the authors of “Introduction To Agile Methods”, there are lots of software development processes available (1). Some of them are explained by the authors in (1). The process control theory has defined two types of processes that are defined process and complex process. Process of Developing New Software Paper. Defined process can be designed and run repeatedly with predictable results on the other hand when a process cannot be designed to get predictable results it is called as “complex process”. Based on this definitions software development is a complex process. There are many pitfalls in traditional methodologies. Traditional methodologies try to predict and create a schedule at the beginning of the software development project and to conform to this we have to wait until the end of software development project. There are many flaws with these methodologies such as it is not possible to get all the requirements at the beginning of the development because users change their requirements frequently. These methodologies worked in the past because development of software was not that complex in the past. Now a day, development of software is becoming more and more complex, also customer wants the development done in short time with good quality. Therefore, the need of designing new software development process realised. This started the development of “Agile methodologies”. Agile methodologies are based on the same principles as that of traditional methodologies, but they address these issues in. Process of Developing New Software Paper.
 
"Our Prices Start at $11.99. As Our First Client, Use Coupon Code GET15 to claim 15% Discount This Month!!"

Week 5 Assignment: Information Technology and Organizational Learning Assignment

Week 5 Assignment: Information Technology and Organizational Learning Assignment

  • Chapter 7 – Review the section on dealing with multiple locations and outsourcing.  Review figure 7.2 and note how virtual team communications further reiterates the importance of this model.
  • Chapter 8 – Review the Siemens AG case study.  Note the importance of understanding the interrelationships amongst all the senior leaders at every location.  Pay special attention to Figure 8.1 and Figure 8.2. Note how the corporate CIO should engage with each of the regional leaders.  Why is this important? Week 5 Assignment: Information Technology and Organizational Learning Assignment.

The above submission should be two -pages in length (one page for each question) and adhere to APA formatting standards.**Remember the APA cover page and the references (if required) do not count towards the page length**
Information Systems for Business and Beyond Questions:
· Chapter 5 – study questions 1-9, Exercise 1 & 3
Information Technology and Organizational Learning Assignment:
· Chapter 5 – Review the Roles of Line Management and Social Network and Information Technology sections. Note the various roles in the organization and note the similarities and differences within each role. Also, note how innovation technology management shapes how we communicate amongst coworkers within an organization.

ORDER A PLAGIARISM-FREE PAPER NOW

The above submission should be one-page in length and adhere to APA formatting standards.
**Remember the APA cover page and the references (if required) do not count towards the page length**
Note the first assignment should be in one section and the second section should have the information from the Information Technology and Organizational Learning assignment. The paper requirements for the two-pages applies to the second part of the assignment directly related to the Information Technology and Organizational Learning assignment.
Organ leader and decision making
Week 5 Written Assignment
This week’s journal articles focus on empowering leadership and effective collaboration in geographically dispersed teams, please answer the following questions:
1. How do geographically dispersed teams collaborate effectively?
2. Please find at least three tools on the market that teams can use to collaborate on a geographically dispersed team. Please note the pros and cons of each tool. Week 5 Assignment: Information Technology and Organizational Learning Assignment.
3. Based on the research above, note which tool you would select if you were managing the geographically dispersed team and why.
Be sure to use the UC Library for scholarly research. Google Scholar is also a great source for research. Please be sure that journal articles are peer-reviewed and are published within the last five years.
The paper should meet the following requirements:
· 3-5 pages in length (not including title page or references)
· APA guidelines must be followed. The paper must include a cover page, an introduction, a body with fully developed content, and a conclusion.
· A minimum of five peer-reviewed journal articles.
The writing should be clear and concise. Headings should be used to transition thoughts. Don’t forget that the grade also includes the quality of writing. Week 5 Assignment: Information Technology and Organizational Learning Assignment.

 
"Our Prices Start at $11.99. As Our First Client, Use Coupon Code GET15 to claim 15% Discount This Month!!"

NR360 Informatic Systems In Healthcare

NR360 Informatic Systems In Healthcare
Reflection
Write a 50-word reflection demonstrating your understanding of how effective nursing care improves patient outcomes related to the selected topic.
Nurse’s Touch – Nursing Informatics & Technology: Virtual Social Networks
EBOOK: McGonigle, D. & Mastrian, K. (2018). Nursing informatics and the foundation of knowledge (4th ed.). Jones & Bartlett.
Criteria
APA format
Theoretical approaches to healthcare ethics have
evolved in response to societal changes. In a 30-year
retrospective article for the Journal of the American
Medical Association, Pellegrino (1993) traced the
evolution of healthcare ethics from the Hippocratic
ethic, to principlism, to the current antiprinciplism
movement.
The Hippocratic tradition emerged from relatively
homogenous societies where beliefs were similar and
most societal members shared common values. The
emphasis was on duty, virtue, and gentlemanly
conduct. NR360 Informatic Systems In Healthcare.
Principlism arose as societies became more
heterogeneous and members began experiencing a
diversity of incompatible beliefs and values; it emerged
as a foundation for ethical decision making. Principles
were expansive enough to be shared by all rational
individuals, regardless of their background and
individual beliefs. This approach continued into the
1900s and was popularized by two bioethicists,
Beauchamp and Childress (1977; 1994), in the last
quarter of the 20th century. Principles are considered
broad guidelines that provide guidance or direction but
leave substantial room for case-specific judgment.
From principles, one can develop more detailed rules
and policies.
Beauchamp and Childress (1994) proposed four
guiding principles: (1) respect for autonomy, (2)
nonmaleficence, (3) beneficence, and (4) justice.
Autonomy refers to the individual’s freedom from
controlling interferences by others and from
personal limitations that prevent meaningful
choices, such as adequate understanding. Two
conditions are essential for autonomy: liberty,
meaning the independence from controlling
influences, and the individual’s capacity for
intentional action.

ORDER A PLAGIARISM-FREE PAPER NOW

Nonmaleficence asserts an obligation not to inflict
harm intentionally and forms the framework for the
standard of due care to be met by any professional.
Obligations of nonmaleficence are obligations of not
inflicting harm and not imposing risks of harm.
Negligence—a departure from the standard of due
care toward others—includes intentionally imposing
risks that are unreasonable and unintentionally but
carelessly imposing risks.
Beneficence refers to actions performed that
contribute to the welfare of others. Two principles
underlie beneficence: Positive beneficence requires
the provision of benefits, and utility requires that
benefits and drawbacks be balanced. One must
avoid negative beneficence, which occurs when
constraints are placed on activities that, even
though they might not be unjust, could in some
situations cause detriment or harm to others.
Justice refers to fair, equitable, and appropriate
treatment in light of what is due or owed to a
person. Distributive justice refers to fair, equitable,
and appropriate distribution in society determined
by justified norms that structure the terms of social
cooperation.
Beauchamp and Childress also suggest three types of
rules for guiding actions: substantive, authority, and
procedural. (Rules are more restrictive in scope than
principles and are more specific in content.)
Substantive rules are rules of truth telling,
confidentiality, privacy, and fidelity, and those
pertaining to the allocation and rationing of health care,
omitting treatment, physician-assisted suicide, and
informed consent. Authority rules indicate who may
and should perform actions. Procedural rules establish
procedures to be followed.
The principlism advocated by Beauchamp and
Childress has since given way to the antiprinciplism
movement, which emerged in the 21st century with the
expansive technological changes and the tremendous
rise in ethical dilemmas accompanying these changes.
Opponents of principlism include those who claim that
its principles do not represent a theoretical approach
as well as those who claim that its principles are too far
removed from the concrete particularities of everyday
human existence; are too conceptual, intangible, or
abstract; or disregard or do not take into account a
person’s psychological factors, personality, life history,
sexual orientation, or religious, ethnic, and cultural
background. Different approaches to making ethical
decisions are next briefly explored, providing the
reader with an understanding of the varied methods
professionals may use to arrive at an ethical decision.
The casuist approach to ethical decision making grew
out of the call for more concrete methods of examining
ethical dilemmas. Casuistry is a case-based ethical
reasoning method that analyzes the facts of a case in a
sound, logical, and ordered or structured manner. The
facts are compared to decisions arising out of
consensus in previous paradigmatic or model cases.
One casuist proponent, Jonsen (1991), prefers
particular and concrete paradigms and analogies over
the universal and abstract theories of principlism.
The Husted bioethical decision-making model centers
on the healthcare professional’s implicit agreement
with the patient or client (Husted & Husted, 1995). It is
based on six contemporary bioethical standards: (1)
autonomy, (2) freedom, (3) veracity, (4) privacy, (5)
beneficence, and (6) fidelity.
The virtue ethics approach emphasizes the virtuous
character of individuals who make the choices. A
virtue is any characteristic or disposition desired in
others or oneself. It is derived from the Greek word
aretai, meaning “excellence,” and refers to what one
expects of oneself and others. Virtue ethicists
emphasize the ideal situation and attempt to identify
and define ideals. Virtue ethics dates back to Plato and
Socrates. NR360 Informatic Systems In Healthcare. When asked “whether virtue can be taught or
whether virtue can be acquired in some other way,
Socrates answers that if virtue is knowledge, then it
can be taught. Thus, Socrates assumes that whatever
can be known can be taught” (Scott, 2002, para. 9).
According to this view, the cause of any moral
weakness is not a matter of character flaws but rather
a matter of ignorance. In other words, a person acts
immorally because the individual does not know what
is really good for him or her. A person can, for example,
be overpowered by immediate pleasures and forget to
consider the long-term consequences. Plato
emphasized that to lead a moral life and not succumb
to immediate pleasures and gratification, one must
have a moral vision. He identified four cardinal virtues:
(1) wisdom, (2) courage, (3) self-control, and (4)
justice.
Aristotle’s (350 BC) Nicomachean principles also
contribute to virtue ethics. According to this
philosopher, virtues are connected to will and motive
because the intention is what determines if one is or is
not acting virtuously. Ethical considerations, according
to his eudaemonistic principles, address the question,
“What is it to be an excellent person?” For Aristotle,
this ultimately means acting in a temperate manner
according to a rational mean between extreme
possibilities.
Virtue ethics has experienced a recent resurgence in
popularity (Ascension Health, 2007). Two of the most
influential moral and medical authors, Pellegrino and
Thomasma (1993), have maintained that virtue theory
should be related to other theories within a
comprehensive philosophy of the health professions.
They argue that moral events are composed of four
elements (the agent, the act, the circumstances, and
the consequences), and state that a variety of theories
must be interrelated to account for different facets of
moral judgment.

ORDER A PLAGIARISM-FREE PAPER NOW

Care ethics is responsiveness to the needs of others
that dictates providing care, preventing harm, and
maintaining relationships. This viewpoint has been in
existence for some time. Engster (2004) stated that
“Carol Gilligan’s In a Different Voice (1982) established
care ethics as a major new perspective in
contemporary moral and political discourse” (p. 113).
The relationship between care and virtue is complex,
however. Benjamin and Curtis (1992) base their
framework on care ethics; they propose that “critical
reflection and inquiry in ethics involves the complex
interplay of a variety of human faculties, ranging from
empathy and moral imagination on the one hand to
analytic precision and careful reasoning on the other”
(p. 12). Care ethicists are less stringently guided by
rules, but rather focus on the needs of others and the
individual’s responsibility to meet those needs. As
opposed to the aforementioned theories that are
centered on the individual’s rights, an ethic of care
emphasizes the personal part of an interdependent
relationship that affects how decisions are made. In
this theory, the specific situation and context in which
the person is embedded become a part of the decisionmaking process.
The consensus-based approach to bioethics was
proposed by Martin (1999), who claims that American
bioethics harbors a variety of ethical methods that
emphasize different ethical factors, including principles,
circumstances, character, interpersonal needs, and
personal meaning. Each method reflects an important
aspect of ethical experience, adds to the others, and
enriches the ethical imagination. Thus working with
these methods provides the challenge and the
opportunity necessary for the perceptive and shrewd
bioethicist to transform them into something new with
value through the process of building ethical
consensus. Diverse ethical insights can be integrated
to support a particular bioethical decision, and that
decision can be understood as a new, ethical whole.
Applying Ethics to Informatics
With the Knowledge Age has come global closeness,
meaning the ability to reach around the globe
instantaneously through technology. Language barriers
are being broken through technologically based
translators that can enhance interaction and exchange
of data and information. Informatics practitioners are
bridging continents, and international panels,
committees, and organizations are beginning to
establish standards and rules for the implementation of
informatics. This international perspective must be
taken into consideration when informatics dilemmas
are examined from an ethical standpoint; it promises to
influence the development of ethical approaches that
begin to accept that healthcare practitioners are
working within international networks and must
recognize, respect, and regard the diverse political,
social, and human factors within informatics ethics.
The various ethical approaches can be used to help
healthcare professionals make ethical decisions in all
areas of practice. The focus of this text is on
informatics. Informatics theory and practice have
continued to grow at a rapid rate and are infiltrating
every area of professional life. New applications and
ways of performing skills are being developed daily.
Therefore, education in informatics ethics is extremely
important.
Typically, situations are analyzed using past
experience and in collaboration with others. Each
situation warrants its own deliberation and unique
approach, because each individual patient seeking or
receiving care has his or her own preferences, quality
of life, and healthcare needs in a situational milieu
framed by financial, provider, setting, institutional, and
social context issues. Clinicians must take into
consideration all of these factors when making ethical
decisions. NR360 Informatic Systems In Healthcare.
The use of expert systems, decision support tools,
evidence-based practice, and artificial intelligence in
the care of patients creates challenges in terms of who
should use these tools, how they are implemented, and
how they are tempered with clinical judgment. All
clinical situations are not the same, and even though
the result of interacting with these systems and tools is
enhanced information and knowledge, the clinician
must weigh this information in light of each patient’s
unique clinical circumstances, including that
individual’s beliefs and wishes. Patients are demanding
access to quality care and the information necessary to
control their lives. Clinicians need to analyze and
synthesize the parameters of each distinctive situation
using a specific decision-making framework that helps
them make the best decisions. Getting it right the first
time has a tremendous impact on expected patient
outcomes. The focus should remain on patient
outcomes while the informatics tools available are
ethically incorporated.
Facing ethical dilemmas on a daily basis and struggling
with unique client situations may cause many clinicians
to question their own actions and the actions of their
colleagues and patients. One must realize that
colleagues and patients may reach very different
decisions, but that does not mean anyone is wrong.
Instead, all parties reach their ethical decision based
on their own review of the situational facts and
understanding of ethics. As one deals with diversity
among patients, colleagues, and administrators, one
must constantly strive to use ethical imagination to
reach ethically competent decisions.
Balancing the needs of society, his or her employer,
and patients could cause the clinician to face ethical
challenges on an everyday basis. Society expects
judicious use of finite healthcare resources. Employers
have their own policies, standards, and practices that
can sometimes inhibit the practice of the clinician. Each
patient is unique and has life experiences that affect
his or her healthcare perspective, choices, motivation,
and adherence. Combine all of these factors with the
challenges posed by informatics, and it is clear that the
evolving healthcare arena calls for an informaticscompetent, politically active, consumer-oriented,
business-savvy, ethical clinician to rule this everchanging landscape known as health care.
The goal of any ethical system should be that a
rational, justifiable decision is reached. Ethics is always
there to help the practitioner decide what is right.
Indeed, the measure of an adequate ethical system,
theory, or approach is, in part, its ability to be useful in
novel contexts. A comprehensive, robust theory of
ethics should be up to the task of addressing a broad
variety of new applications and challenges at the
intersection of informatics and health care.
The information concerning an ethical dilemma must
be viewed in the context of the dilemma to be useful.
Bioinformatics could gather, manipulate, classify,
analyze, synthesize, retrieve, and maintain databases
related to ethical cases, the effective reasoning applied
to various ethical dilemmas, and the resulting ethical
decisions. This input would certainly be potent—but the
resolution of dilemmas cannot be achieved simply by
examining relevant cases from a database. Instead,
clinicians must assess each situational context and the
patient’s specific situation and needs and make their
ethical decisions based on all of the information they
have at hand.
Ethics is exciting, and competent clinicians need to
know about ethical dilemmas and solutions in their
professions. Ethicists have often been thought of as
experts in the arbitrary, ambiguous, and ungrounded
judgments of other people. They know that they make
the best decisions they can based on the situation and
stakeholders at hand. Just as clinicians try to make the
best healthcare decisions with and for their patients,
ethically driven practitioners must do the same. Each
healthcare provider must critically think through the
situation to arrive at the best decision.
To make ethical decisions about informatics
technologies and patients’ intimate healthcare data and
information, the healthcare provider must be competent
in informatics. To the extent that information technology
is reshaping healthcare practices or promises to
improve patient care, healthcare professionals must be
trained and competent in the use of these tools. This
competency needs to be evaluated through
instruments developed by professional groups or
societies; such assessment will help with consistency
and quality. For the healthcare professional to be an
effective patient advocate, he or she must understand
how information technology affects the patient and the
subsequent delivery of care. Information science and
its effects on health care are both interesting and
important. It follows that information technology and its
ethical, social, and legal implications should be
incorporated into all levels of professional education.
The need for confidentiality was perhaps first
articulated by Hippocrates; thus if anything is different
in today’s environment, it is simply the ways in which
confidentiality can be violated. Perhaps the use of
computers for clinical decision support and data mining
in research will raise new ethical issues. Ethical
dilemmas associated with the integration of informatics
must be examined to provide an ethical framework that
considers all of the stakeholders. Patients’ rights must
be protected in the face of a healthcare provider’s duty
to his or her employer and society at large when
initiating care and assigning finite healthcare
resources. An ethical framework is necessary to help
guide healthcare providers in reference to the ethical
treatment of electronic data and information during all
stages of collection, storage, manipulation, and
dissemination. These new approaches and means
come with their own ethical dilemmas. Often they are
dilemmas not yet faced owing to the cutting-edge
nature of these technologies.
Just as processes and models are used to diagnose
and treat patients in practice, so a model in the
analysis and synthesis of ethical dilemmas or cases
can also be applied. An ethical model for ethical
decision making (Box 5-1) facilitates the ability to
analyze the dilemma and synthesize the information
into a plan of action (McGonigle, 2000). The model
presented here is based on the letters in the word
ethical. Each letter guides and prompts the healthcare
provider to think critically (think and rethink) through
the situation presented. The model is a tool because, in
the final analysis, it allows the nurse objectively to
ascertain the essence of the dilemma and develop a
plan of action. NR360 Informatic Systems In Healthcare.

 
"Our Prices Start at $11.99. As Our First Client, Use Coupon Code GET15 to claim 15% Discount This Month!!"

WEEK13-ResearchPaper-InfoTech In A Global Economy

WEEK13-ResearchPaper-InfoTech In A Global Economy
Course: InfoTech in a Global Economy
LATE SUBMISSION WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED BY PROF.
Due Date – 1 day
Research Paper: 

Big Data Analytics

Find a peer-reviewed scholarly journal article discussing big data analytics. Complete a review of the article by writing a 2-3 page overview of the article. This will be a detailed summary of the journal article, including concepts discussed and findings. Additionally, find one other source (it does not have to be a peer-reviewed journal article) that substantiates the findings in the article you are reviewing.  WEEK13-ResearchPaper-InfoTech In A Global Economy.
You should use the UC library ( https://www.ucumberlands.edu/library) and/or Google Scholar to find these types of articles ( https://scholar.google.com/ )
Once you find the article, you will read it and write a review of it.  This is considered a research article review.
Citation: Marr, Bernard. Data Strategy : How to Profit from a World of Big Data, Analytics and the Internet of Things . London: Kogan Page, 2017. Print.

ORDER A PLAGIARISM-FREE PAPER NOW

Reading Assignments
GASTAUD MAÇADA, A. C., ALFONSO BRINKHUES, R., & DA SILVA FREITAS JUNIOR, J. C. (2019). Information Management Capability and Big Data Strategy Implementation. RAE: Revista de Administração de Empresas, 59(6), 379–388.  https://doi.org/10.1590/S0034-759020190604 . WEEK13-ResearchPaper-InfoTech In A Global Economy.
BARIKA, M. et al. Orchestrating Big Data Analysis Workflows in the Cloud: Research Challenges, Survey, and Future Directions. ACM Computing Surveys, [s. l.], v. 52, n. 5, p. 1–41, 2019. DOI 10.1145/3332301.
Prof. Guidelines

  • Be approximately four to five pages in length, not including the required cover page and reference page.
  • Follow APA 7 guidelines. Your paper should include an introduction, a body with fully developed content, and a conclusion.
  • Support your answers with the readings from the course and at least two scholarly journal articles to support your positions, claims, and observations, in addition to your textbook.
  • Be clearly and well-written, concise, and logical, using excellent grammar and style techniques. You are being graded in part on the quality of your writing.

Required Books & Resources
Title: Entrepreneurship in the Global Economy ISBN: 9781139536660Authors: Henry Kressel, Thomas V. LentoPublisher: Cambridge University PressPublication Date: 2012-07-19
Title: Federal Cybersecurity ISBN: 9781634853965Authors: Cory MedinaPublication Date: 2016-01-01
Title: Mastering Blockchain ISBN: 9781787125445Authors: Imran BashirPublication Date: 2017-04-28
Title: Global Technology ISBN: 9780309185059Authors: Steve Olson, National Academy of EngineeringPublisher: National Academies PressPublication Date: 2011-02-08
“APA7 Format”
“NO PLAGIARISM” Plagiarism includes copying and pasting material   from the internet into assignments without properly citing the source   of the material.  WEEK13-ResearchPaper-InfoTech In A Global Economy.

 
"Our Prices Start at $11.99. As Our First Client, Use Coupon Code GET15 to claim 15% Discount This Month!!"